Kafka combines three key capabilities so you can implement your use cases for event streaming end-to-end with a single battle-tested solution:

  1. To publish (write) and subscribe to (read) streams of events, including continuous import/export of your data from other systems.
  2. To store streams of events durably and reliably for as long as you want.
  3. To process streams of events as they occur or retrospectively.

And all this functionality is provided in a distributed, highly scalable, elastic, fault-tolerant, and secure manner. Kafka can be deployed on bare-metal hardware, virtual machines, and containers, and on-premises as well as in the cloud. You can choose between self-managing your Kafka environments and using fully managed services offered by a variety of vendors.

How does Kafka work ?

Kafka is a distributed system consisting of servers and clients that communicate via a high-performance TCP network protocols. It can be deployed on bare-metal hardware, virtual machines, and containers in on-premise as well as cloud environments.

Servers: Kafka is run as a cluster of one or more servers that can span multiple datacenters or cloud regions. Some of these servers form the storage layer, called the brokers. Other servers run Kafka Connect to continuously import and export data as event streams to integrate Kafka with your existing systems such as relational databases as well as other Kafka clusters. To let you implement mission-critical use cases, a Kafka cluster is highly scalable and fault-tolerant: if any of its servers fails, the other servers will take over their work to ensure continuous operations without any data loss.

Clients: They allow you to write distributed applications and microservices that read, write, and process streams of events in parallel, at scale, and in a fault-tolerant manner even in the case of network problems or machine failures. Kafka ships with some such clients included, which are augmented by dozens of clients provided by the Kafka community: clients are available for Java and Scala including the higher-level Kafka Streams library, for Go, Python, C/C++, and many other programming languages as well as REST APIs.

Leave a Reply